Hippodrome Stages Monster of a Show

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Candace Clift as Victor has a monstrous task ahead of him/her during All Girl Frankenstein. (Photograph by Michael A. Eaddy)


In All Girl Frankenstein, Candace Clift plays misguided Victor in a dramatic retelling of Mary Shelley’s classic tale.


Candace Cliftin front of the Hippodrome before a recent rehearsal.

Candace Clift relaxes in front of the Hippodrome State Theatre before a recent rehearsal for All Girl Frankenstein.

In the first act of All Girl Frankenstein —playing through Nov. 7 at the Hippodrome State Theatre—the audience is pulled into the turbulent world of Victor Frankenstein. The young man copes with his mother’s death, goes off to university and creates a grotesque monster, then confronts the untimely death of another beloved family member.

The consequences of all that drama leave poor Victor with unbearable anguish that only intensifies during the second act. It’s a grueling role only the toughest stage actor could pull off.

Thankfully, Candace Clift is up to the task.

For two heart-wrenching hours, Clift breathes life into a confused character that definitely could use a hug or two.

“It’s a juicy, juicy role,” Clift told gainesvilledowntown.com. “I’ve always loved old, scary Halloween movies, and Frankenstein is so iconic—the hubris of this man who attempts to play God.”

Frankenstein was the creation of Mary Shelley, who published her first novel, Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus, in 1818, when she was just 21 years old. Shelley’s own tragedy-filled life provided fodder for her ill-fated protagonist.

“You will never meet a character in literature so full of denial as Victor,” Clift said. “He’s very conflicted.”

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Pride Festival/Oct. 24, 2015

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Photo Page: Active Streets/Fall 2015

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Big Little Mike’s in Charge at Death or Glory Tattoos

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little mike

“Little Mike” Mehaffey surrounded by tattoo art. (Photo by Lena Crane/Reflections of Light Photography)


The colorful owner of the downtown tattoo parlor takes an old-school approach to body art.


Mike Mehaffey’s mother was not pleased when she discovered her son’s first tattoo. After all, he was only 14.

“I had skipped school to get the tattoo from a biker named Eddie,” Mehaffey recalled. “It was completely illegal.”

A few weeks later, an exhausted Mehaffey fell asleep in his backyard after a long afternoon of chores.

“I was sitting down and my mom woke me up,” he said. “She saw the tattoo and started screaming, ‘I can’t believe you did that!’”

The humiliating episode might have scarred some teens. For Mehaffey, however, it was only the beginning of a lifelong love affair with body art.

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The Bull is Everyone’s Friendly Neighborhood Bar

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In the heart of downtown, a little establishment with a lot of character.


There’s nothing more satisfying than walking into a local watering hole after a long day and seeing a friendly face behind the bar.

One such place is The Bull, a downtown Gainesville establishment where no one is a stranger. Manager Jacob Larson and his bartending staff make sure of that with warm smiles and, oftentimes, firm handshakes. Maybe even a hug.

“I love this place because it’s so welcoming,” said Del Wallis, who was catching up with old friends on a  spirited Friday night at The Bull.

The Gainesville native, who now lives in Jacksonville with her husband and 3-year-old daughter, was in town visiting family. She couldn’t resist dropping in at her old haunt.

“This place feels like home,” she said. “It’s small, but not too small, and it’s not loud like so many bars.”

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Marty Liquori All Jazzed Up at Leonardo’s 706

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The former world-class runner-turned-musician — and longtime Gainesville resident — is taking “retirement” in stride.


Marty Liquori and his jazz guitar.

There was a time when the world knew Marty Liquori for his legs and feet, which for a memorable decade in the 1960s and ’70s zipped him around tracks faster than just about any other human.

Today, however, Liquori is better known for his hands and fingers, which hold and strum a jazz guitar as well as anyone in North Central Florida.

Call it Marty Liquori’s second wind.

“I consider myself retired and pretty much a fulltime musician,” said Liquori, who has also been an Olympian, an entrepreneur, a broadcaster, an author, a lecturer and a leukemia survivor. He’s also been a Gainesville resident for more than 40 years.

At 66, Liquori is at the heart of the area’s jazz scene, not only performing three nights a week but also serving as vice president of the Gainesville Friends of Jazz and executive director of the Gainesville Jazz Festival. In 2013, the Jazz Journalists Association honored him as a JJA Jazz Hero.

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High Dive is Always a Happening Place

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For more than two decades, the music venue has showcased some of the best talent to pass through Gainesville as well as top local bands.


The vintage poster wall at High Dive.

The vintage poster wall at High Dive.

You could say that Pat Lavery was once the poster child for the downtown music venue now known as High Dive. That is, in his younger years he’d go around Gainesville and post announcements of upcoming shows for what was then called the Covered Dish.

“I was their flyer guy,” Lavery said with a hint of pride. “It got me in the place for free.”

Today, Lavery gets into High Dive for free by booking all the acts there—and at several other venues around Florida—through his Gainesville-based promotions company, Glory Days Presents.

“Back then, I had no idea what promoting music was all about,” he said. “I learned so much about touring shows and the underground music scene by observation.”

Lavery and the High Dive staff keep things hopping almost every night of the week with live music as well as special events, such as standup comedy, art shows and food truck rallies.

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First Magnitude: New Brew Crew in Town

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A year into business, the taps are flowing strong at Gainesville’s second craft brewery.


mag logoEric Dreyer has both a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in food science from the University of Florida, which is why some of his friends might have been amused by his most recent career move.

The 29-year-old Dreyer left the security of a research position in the tasting lab at UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences for the unpredictable ebbs and flows of a local startup—and he couldn’t be happier.

That local startup is First Magnitude Brewing Co. and, as an award-winning, craft-beer home brewer, Dreyer is doing something he is passionate about.

“I was happy with my job at the university, but this was too good an opportunity to pass up,” Dreyer said, pointing to the shiny, 15-barrel brew house that constitutes FM’s production facility a block off South Main Street in Gainesville.

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Crane Ramen: Soup Kitchen Extraordinaire

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SHIO: Japanese Sea Salt flavor with clear seafood chaitan broth topped with crab, pork belly, scallions, enoki, garlic oil, nori and egg.


Gainesville’s first restaurant specializing in ramen noodles has done a booming business since opening last December.


gainesvilledowntown.com

How serious are Fred Brown and Steve Grimes about ramen?

Last November the two men flew to New York City for what Grimes called “a ramen-eating extravaganza.” Over two days, they visited seven restaurants and shared between 20 and 25 varieties of the Japanese-style noodle.

They compared notes about the bowls and agreed their taste palates were in harmony. Then they returned to Gainesville and got down to business.

On Dec. 1, 2014, with Brown as operational managing partner and Grimes as executive chef, they opened Crane Ramen in an old storefront at 16 SW 1st Ave. in downtown Gainesville.

Since then, people have lined up to get inside the cozy noodle kitchen and experience for themselves main dishes—or bowls, rather—never before savored in North Central Florida.

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Chef Ami: Fresh to Your Doorstep

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Box of Ingredients Final

The Gainesville business caters to those who might not have the time to shop for food but who still enjoy preparing nutritious, home-cooked meals.


Laura dePaz Cabrera is a busy woman. She balances her career as an attorney with a personal life that includes her husband and their 5-year-old son. She also is the lead female vocalist for the Gainesville-based, Latin-fusion band Tropix.

No wonder that planning family meals is usually not at the top of her daily to-do list.

“I really genuinely love to cook,” she said, “but working a busy and somewhat unpredictable fulltime job, I don’t have the time—or the energy—to plan out home-cooked meals every night.”

That’s why she happily welcomes Chef Ami into her kitchen.

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